Tagged: genealogy

Are You Here- An Exhibition Documentary

This is a short video on the recent art exhibition I had at Gladstone’s Land, Edinburgh. It was filmed by Bad Monkey Films, and shows the installation process, opening night event and a short introduction to the project featuring comments from some of the attendees.

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Exhibition- Are You Here, Gladstone’s Land Gallery, Edinburgh

I am currently showing my latest work at the Gladstone’s Land Gallery, Lawnmarket, Edinburgh (on the Royal Mile).  The exhibition showcases some of the illustration work which I developed from my genealogical travels, and also a preview of my e-book which accompanies the exhibition.

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Hope to see you here… do come along if you happen to be in Edinburgh!

 

The wall of inspiration

So, this is what part of my studio looks like at the moment after two weeks of research away for my Are You Here Project.  I thought I would share it for a bit of fun (I liked the way the printed out photographs all sat nicely together), and also ask how other people who do creative work get inspiration and plan out projects.

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Retracing the steps of illustrator Stella Langdale

Yesterday I made a journey to Hove Library to see the book “Unknown Brighton” which was published in 1926, containing text by George Aitchison and illustrations by Stella Langdale, who is a member of my family tree.  I had first heard of this book through the website “Ye Olde Sussex Pages” and a little research using the Brighton and Hove online web catalogue revealed that there was a copy in Hove library.

I had never been to Hove before, yet I “knew” where to find it as I instinctively wandered upstairs and found the local studies room, sought out the Brighton shelves and there it was!  I was absolutely delighted to be able to hold the very book in my own hands.  It had that well worn appearance, with pages a little fragile and well thumbed.  The blue cover and gold embossed lettering was slightly faded and looking to the side one could observe the curved and folded leaves of paper, hiding the treasure within.

Stella did 24 aquatint illustrations for this book, and a number of line drawings which annotate the text at key parts.  Even though these were prints of aquatints, it was wonderful to see these as they reveal a little of Stella’s style.  The influence of the Glasgow school in her long flowing lines can be seen, particularly within the Pavilion illustration, and elegant use of tone and shadow add to the delight (view more of Stella’s work here, and read my previous posts about my genealogical art journey project here).  The words of the book relate to the many sides of Brighton which a visitor may not know about; written in the 1920’s one wonders to what extent the visitor of those times went “of the beaten track” to discover the environment beyond the seafront, aquarium and pavilion.  Indeed, many visitors today may do the very same, although the Lanes is of course now well known for shopping and entertainment.

The Lanes today, with a welcome and bunting

The Lanes today, with a welcome and bunting

There were a number of references to the development of Brighton as a settlement, and also to several works held in the museum.  I ventured to Hove museum as it was nearby, and discovered the very same amber pot which Stella had completed line drawings of!  Information panels told me that this pot was “one of Britain’s most important bronze age finds”; for me it is also a great family history find… nose to case with something Stella had seen, and drawn!

Face to face with a find of historical and family significance

Face to face with a find of historical and family significance

On return to town I also went back to the Brighton Museum and Art Gallery, seeking out a mug which featured in the book.  I knew from a previous visit that it was likely to be part of the Henry Willett collection, as a maritime themed item of pottery (Willett was a local businessman who amassed a huge collection of porcelain and catalogued it into various themes to help people learn about different topics relevant to social history, it was given to Brighton museum in 1903- therefore quite new for the Langdale family and other Brighton residents at the time when Unknown Brighton was written).  I scoured the display cases and opened all of the discovery drawers in the room, to no avail.  No sailors cup.  I did find it on one of the interactive displays, however, so I have “sort of” seen it, and discovered it was made in 1895 by Charles Brennam.  Item 324 must be in store!

Brighton Museum and Art Gallery- source of inspiration and treasures!

Brighton Museum and Art Gallery- source of inspiration

In the section regarding the Lanes, available on the “Olde Sussex” website two images from this book are shown, one of Black Lion Lane  and one of a fig tree.  After my amber cup find I was feeling upbeat and thought, yes, I will try and find those views.  Chances of finding a random tree in the middle of a busy City Centre?  Pretty minimal, but I thought I would try anyway.  The Lanes were less busy than the previous few bank holiday sunny days and it had only just stopped raining.  The paving was sprinkled with rain and shone in the sun, good exploring territory as only the hardy few would be out and about at this time (late lunch, when those huge bed and breakfast full English-es have worn off and tastebuds start demanding attention again).

Black Lion Lane was easy, I had actually walked down this lane before, and seen the lion (as detailed in a previous post).  On thinking about the aquatint, I recreated the view in my minds eye; it was the route from Ship Street to Black Lion Street.  The little inshot about halfway up the snickel (as Yorkshire folk would call it, but here my Pevsner guide tells me it is called a twitten) looked familiar, it was on the right hand side of the aquatint therefore must be in that direction.  The hanging lantern was long gone, a modern street light was in its place.  I took a photo of this and then walked back in the other direction to take another photograph, just to be on the safe side.  I marvelled at the crazy pebbled walls, which have now become familiar to me and stroked one appreciatively on the way past.  It was shiny and smooth with the passing of many people.  I wondered if Stella may have done the same thing.

Black Lion Lane view

Black Lion Lane view (compare with original)

At the end of the lane I stepped out of the enclosure to the street and into the light of Ship Street, looking back at my find, happily, and pausing to think how interesting it was to actually be walking in the places where my ancestors had been.  I peeked across the road.  There was another twitten, inviting exploration.  I was feeling a little tired and was about to go back through the lane to find a coffee stop, but thought “no, another five minutes won’t hurt”.  I walked across the busy street (avoiding the white and teal taxi, whose colours reflect the railings on the promenade) and into the lane.  This lane was no ordinary lane.  There were buildings on one side and a low wall with gates on the other.  Some plants were hanging over the brick wall and some trellis was trying to keep control of a tangle of greenery which appeared to be winning that particular battle.  Looking up, I saw bright green leaves with the sun shining through. Slowly it dawned on me that there was something unusual about these leaves.  They were a pretty shape and some had fruit.  Was this THE tree?   Not being the best at botanical studies I doubted my initial judgement, but I took some photographs and thought out loud “how long do fig trees live?”.  This was not just any old tree, this was a beautiful tumbling tree, whose branches reached over the wall and spread out happily.  Just like the one in Stella’s drawing.

Stella's fig tree?

Stella’s fig tree?

I retired to the 16th Century Cricketers Arms (Brighton’s oldest pub) and had a long lemonade and lime pause.  Had I really found the tree?  Was this the one in the aquatint?  Was this a fig tree or was I just making it up, hoping it was true?  I resorted to modern technology; wifi revealed that yes, this was indeed what a fig tree looked like, and yes, it did look remarkably like the one in the aquatint.  Ficus said Wikipedia.  Ficus religiousa I thought!  Not the Bodhi tree, but a little family tree remaining just for me!

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The sources of information which I used for this blog post are:

Travels, moves, cycling and other transportation

So, when I was in Bristol I commented on how much I liked my “bike experience” there, and  a few people (James Corner and Calmgrove, do check out their blogs) mentioned I should seek out the cycle map.  I do indeed rather like it, a 3D view of all of the major cycle routes.

The map is located by the new square, which contains @Bristol and the planetarium; it made me think about the big distances which my family have moved over time, something I am considering for my art project.  How did they get where they were going and why did they go there?  Where have your family moved to or from?  Do you have any exciting genealogical adventures to share?

Bristol to the north of england

Bristol to the North of England

Brighton and beyond

Brighton and beyond

My bike needs to get out, it is feeling sad attached to the railings where I am staying! I have been walking everywhere here.

Brighton is bright in all this lovely sun!

From when I first woke up in Brighton (and all bank holiday long) I have been treated to a wonderfully sunny day, with a beautiful blue azure sea and the occasional group of white yachts sailing on the horizon.  Fantastic art territory!  I can see why artists are attracted to this city.  Photographs almost do not do it justice, it actually reminded me of the sea in the Outer Hebrides, as it was so deep turquoise in parts.

Beautiful sea

Beautiful Brightonian sea

Brighton yachts

Brighton yachts

When I booked this journey away I did not notice that it was bank holiday time (and also English half term) so perhaps I am getting a little of that “totally full beach with barely a pebble to see” Victorian holiday experience, as is shown in this Photo History of Sussex website!  To add to the bustling atmosphere, it has been the last few days of the Brighton Festival and also the last week of the Brighton Fringe… the Lanes and North Laine are full of entertainment and Fringe City is a feast of entertainment.

fringe city street

Fringe City street in the sun

Fringe city

Fringe city

The reason I am in Brighton is part of my Art Project “Are You Here”, to retrace the steps of my ancestors Marmaduke and Stella Langdale; artists who were born in Middlesex but stayed in Brighton for a number of years.  In researching census and other archival information, I discovered that Stella went to Brighton School of Art, and then Glasgow School of Art whilst Marmaduke was a Turner travel prize winner.  Stella’s work can be seen in the Maltwood Art Gallery in Canada, although I am also retracing some of the views in illustrations which she did for a book called “Unknown Brighton”, detailed online here.  I found the Black Lion yesterday, but it is now adorned with a little gold as well!

The Black Lion

The Black Lion

Pondering history and getting to know your environment

Today I went to three museums… the Architecture Centre (well, I would, wouldn’t I.. the planner and conservation-ist in me can’t help it!), Arnolfini and M-Shed.  I also wandered along the river and took lots of photographs.

Bristol (on a bus in M-Shed)

Bristol (on a bus in M-Shed)

At The Architecture Centre they have an ever changing programme of events and exhibitions, sited in a harbourside building.  The current exhibition focuses on what the future of the city could look like, and invites lots and lots of post it note contributions to add ideas to the city map.  There are showcases of successful environmental schemes and projects, I was amused and intrigued to see “The Bristol pound”, first of all it looks really aesthetically pleasing, but secondly it is run on the basis of community good and helps support local businesses.  Great idea!  A small display on “Bristol Opening Doors” was really interesting as it invited people to contribute stories and “favourite buildings”, and also showcased a new app which is a walking trail (available on www.bristolopeningdoors.org ).  I enjoyed the illustrations and design of this, and of course the wonderful buildings!  I am starting to recognise more and more of the streetscape and landmarks here, and this will help discover more.  Chatting briefly to the friendly staff there I also was given a flyer for a website called “Know Your Place: Learning and Sharing Information about Historic Bristol”, run by English Heritage and Bristol City Council.  I am looking forward to exploring this properly, as yesterday (on my visit to the City Art Gallery and Museum) I was fascinated with the historic maps… this site lets you overlay and integrate different maps from various eras.  Oooh!  Just what I am after, as I can spot the places where my ancestors lived. Ideal for “Are You Here” research!

This was my first visit to Arnolfini, I have walked past it many times but always en route to somewhere else or whizzing past on my bike.  I enjoyed the Susanne Kriemann’s Modelling (Construction School) exhibition, it brings a little of an “art- planning- environment” discussion into a contemporary art environment.  The photographs of quarries were quite spectacular, many of the works are designed to provoke discussion on archives, and also problem solving in design education.

M-Shed could keep me amused for hours, it is full of all sorts of historical bits and pieces, I really did get lost in history.  Interestingly for me, there was a whole section on Bristol people and families, saying “it’s important to know where you’ve come from so that you know where you’re going”… the question was posed “why did you leave?”.

M-Shed Family History Information Panel

M-Shed Family History Information Panel

In the case of my family I suspect it was for work as it would have to be a fairly major reason such as this to move to the opposite end of the country.  There are themed galleries at M-Shed, Bristol people, Bristol life, Bristol places (and a special exhibition, currently on chocolate!), all of them have real objects to explore, some thought provoking interactive displays (I loved the one on “what makes a Bristolian”.. very funny mixtures of answers come out of that!), video and multimedia and also lots of transport to explore.  No “please keep off” signs here.  I am even starting to recognise the different Bristol districts, having passed through them by bike or bus at various points of my several visits over the years, it is nice to recognise things in a “technically not home” city!  M-shed cafe is worth a visit, local produce, family friendly, vegan friendly and lovely views.

Oh, and did I mention the view from the roof terrace….

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