Tagged: Brighton

No-one told me there were actually two pavilions!

Yes, I discovered there are indeed two Brighton Pavilions.. only one is slightly less famous than the other.

This is the first one which many people know and love:

But wait, what is this, hiding behind Western Road?


It is the Western pavilion!

The Western Pavilion

The Western Pavilion

Home to A H Wilds, 1831!

Travels, moves, cycling and other transportation

So, when I was in Bristol I commented on how much I liked my “bike experience” there, and  a few people (James Corner and Calmgrove, do check out their blogs) mentioned I should seek out the cycle map.  I do indeed rather like it, a 3D view of all of the major cycle routes.

The map is located by the new square, which contains @Bristol and the planetarium; it made me think about the big distances which my family have moved over time, something I am considering for my art project.  How did they get where they were going and why did they go there?  Where have your family moved to or from?  Do you have any exciting genealogical adventures to share?

Bristol to the north of england

Bristol to the North of England

Brighton and beyond

Brighton and beyond

My bike needs to get out, it is feeling sad attached to the railings where I am staying! I have been walking everywhere here.

West Pier, Brighton, a sad shell of its former self

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I had heard about West Pier before (and indeed glimpsed it from afar on a previous visit to the city) but I went for a closer look yesterday and was deeply saddened to see its demise.  Only the seagulls can view those iron beams and beautiful decorative elements properly now.  I have created a slideshow of the images so you can see different views.

When my relatives were here it would have been a wonderful sight to behold, and also the “new pier” opened in 1899 (the one which now has the flashing Brighton pier sign on.. as this postcard from the Old Stratford Upon Avon Brighton section shows).

Sea at night

Sea at night

The beach and sea in Brighton at night are quite spectacular, I loved these reflections and could not resist photographing them, neither, it seems, could this person on the beach.  The reflections come from the bright lights of the funfair and signage on the “Brighton Pier”.  I took this with a tripod and am rather pleased with the result, almost a rainbow of stripes in the sea.

Brighton is bright in all this lovely sun!

From when I first woke up in Brighton (and all bank holiday long) I have been treated to a wonderfully sunny day, with a beautiful blue azure sea and the occasional group of white yachts sailing on the horizon.  Fantastic art territory!  I can see why artists are attracted to this city.  Photographs almost do not do it justice, it actually reminded me of the sea in the Outer Hebrides, as it was so deep turquoise in parts.

Beautiful sea

Beautiful Brightonian sea

Brighton yachts

Brighton yachts

When I booked this journey away I did not notice that it was bank holiday time (and also English half term) so perhaps I am getting a little of that “totally full beach with barely a pebble to see” Victorian holiday experience, as is shown in this Photo History of Sussex website!  To add to the bustling atmosphere, it has been the last few days of the Brighton Festival and also the last week of the Brighton Fringe… the Lanes and North Laine are full of entertainment and Fringe City is a feast of entertainment.

fringe city street

Fringe City street in the sun

Fringe city

Fringe city

The reason I am in Brighton is part of my Art Project “Are You Here”, to retrace the steps of my ancestors Marmaduke and Stella Langdale; artists who were born in Middlesex but stayed in Brighton for a number of years.  In researching census and other archival information, I discovered that Stella went to Brighton School of Art, and then Glasgow School of Art whilst Marmaduke was a Turner travel prize winner.  Stella’s work can be seen in the Maltwood Art Gallery in Canada, although I am also retracing some of the views in illustrations which she did for a book called “Unknown Brighton”, detailed online here.  I found the Black Lion yesterday, but it is now adorned with a little gold as well!

The Black Lion

The Black Lion

Southern Travels

I had meant to post this earlier but I have been a little tired from all the travelling and absorbing new places!  Along the lines of a previous post on views from the East Coast main line train, I am adding a few from the Bristol to Brighton train.

First of all a musical sighting.. I was wondering why I had had various Bonzo Dog band songs in my head when I was staying in Bristol, now I know as I had been seeing buses with signs for Keynsham, the title of one of their albums!

Tell me more about the...

Tell me more about the…


I also enjoyed passing through Bath, as you can see a little of the sweeping crescents and houses clinging to the hill, constructed with that famous creamy Bath stone.  Here is a glimpse through the window, over the cricket ground.

Bath spa

Bath spa

I was really happy to see this…

White horse

White horse.. there in the top right corner on the hill!

I think this is the Westbury white horse, though do correct me if I am wrong.  I have happy memories of seeing the Kilburn white horse when I was little, so I do like spotting these additions to the landscape.

Sneak peek at my current work in progress: Letters to my Ancestors

This is a “part one” documenting my work for the sculptural pieces I am doing as part of my current project, planning for an exhibition in July at Gladstone’s Land in Edinburgh.  The works form part of a filmed and photographic work, incorporated into an e-book which will be debuted at the exhibition and then released online after this.

I have now completed the letters, shown here with their first coat of paint.

Work in progress, part 1 of Are You Here

Work in progress, part 1 of Are You Here

The letters of the project “Are you here” are arranged and re-arranged to form various statements, at three temporary on site locations in Bristol and Brighton, where two lines of my family come from.

These works are designed to question the nature of family and genealogical links to places, making us wonder whether it is a coincidence that we are instinctively drawn to places or if we actively try to create links with places where we have connections (no matter how distant or close).