Seeking out Quiet Space in the Busy City

Sometimes one would like a quiet space. In Glasgow this is easy, the old nickname for the City is “Dear Green Place” due to the number of parks and gardens within the City boundary so you are never far from a little but of nature.  I recently took my camera to the Necropolis (Victorian “City of the Dead” where all the great and good were buried), which some might say is a little bit of a strange way to pass the time, but a wander around this cemetery is far from dismal or spooky as it has some fascinating architectural monuments and wonderful views over the city.  If you are lucky you may even run into some of the resident deer, though they were proving to be a little elusive on my visit!  I love the care and attention to detail seen in the architectural and monumental masonry, there are some delicate inscriptions and bold columns carved with everything from Greek acanthus leaves to Egyptian eyes.

There is a lot of information on the Glasgow Necropolis in the Glasgow City Council Necropolis Heritage Trail, and the Friends of the Necropolis website. You can often pick up paper versions of the heritage trail from nearby public libraries (try GOMA Library in Queen Street within the City Centre, after a nosey at the art upstairs), or the Tourist Information Centre (now located on Buchanan Street).

When you are finished your wander around the Necropolis, a pleasant place to sit is the Zen Garden designed in 1993 by Yasutaro Tanaka.  It sits in the grounds of the Saint Mungo Museum of religious life which houses a fascinating collection of paintings and objects from all over the world and celebrates the diversity of Glasgow’s cultural heritage and population.  One can even take tea in the zen garden on a sunny day, as there is a restful cafe in the museum.

Advertisements

4 comments

  1. Linda Cote

    Great photos! My grandmother loved to visit cemeteries because they were beautiful green spaces. My friends always thought it odd, but we would take flowers to the graves of our relatives and then have a huge picnic lunch sitting right next to them! I remember these moments with great fondness.

  2. Leonie Andrews

    I really enjoyed your selection of inscriptions – lovely found poems. Like my Mum before me I also like visiting cemeteries. The most exotic and the one most filled with architectural treasures was the cemetery outside Agra in India. There were fantastic Victorian-era Anglo-Indian mausoleums, a weird combination of Mughal and English styles of architecture. There were also graves going back to the 16th and 17th centuries. The earliest grave we could read was that of an English merchant dated 1614. The tomb itself, not surprisingly was built in a Muslim style.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s